Printreg Archive
Re: RMP UPDATE - Propane


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From: gjonesprinting@aol.com
Date: Fri Jul 23 1999 - 16:14:31 CDT


To All:

FYI

Gary Jones
GATF

Attached is an Association Press story that notes that S. 880 has been passed
by
the House of Representatives. S. 880 is the legislation sets out guidelines
for
access to Offsite Consequence Analysis information that is required under
Section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act. If signed by President Clinton, the
legislation also would remove propane and other flammable fuels sold by
retailers from the list of chemicals covered by the Risk Management Program.
The bill still needs concurrence from the Senate as several changes were made
by
the House.
I will let you know more about the details once the legislation has been
signed.

Hazard Disclosure Moratorium OK'd

ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON (AP) -- The House agreed Wednesday to a one-year
moratorium on the Internet dissemination of information about
potential hazards at some 66,000 facilities using or making toxic
chemicals.

The House measure, approved without opposition, addresses law
enforcement concerns that the information, aimed at helping
communities prepare for worst-case accident scenarios, could be
used by terrorists.

The Senate last month approved a similar bill. Rep. Sherrod
Brown, D-Ohio, said it was likely the Senate would accept the House
version so that the legislation could be sent quickly to President
Clinton for his signature.

The 1990 Clean Air Act required that plants dealing with toxic
chemicals provide to the Environmental Protection Agency by June 21
this year a Risk Management Plan including a worst-case scenario
for accidents.

The EPA originally wanted to make much of that information
public. But the FBI, the Justice Department and some members of
Congress argued that detailing on the Internet possible disaster
scenarios for each chemical plant or user poses a national security
threat.

The legislation requires that local safety officials still have
access to the information.

Brown said the administration would have a year to find ways to
put the information on the Internet so that public interests are
protected without giving terrorists a road map to potential
targets.

Environmentalist groups opposed the moratorium, arguing that the
potential danger to 85 million people living within five miles of a
chemical facility outweigh the terrorist threat.


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