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printreg, December, 2002
"Define a Flammable Liquid"


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From: Debra Jacobson (djacobson@istc.illinois.edu)
Date: Tue, 24 Dec 2002 07:12:31


Another OSHA related guide. Keep in mind OSHA has specific flammable material storage requirements related to quantity and time frame, as well as type of storage vessel (cabinet or dispensing can). Your state and local fire department may also have similar requirements as well as your insurance carrier.
Debra Jacobson
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How does OSHA define flammable liquids? At 29 CFR 1910.106(a)(19), OSHA defines "flammable liquids" as any liquids having a flash point below 100 F (37.8 C), except any mixture having components with flashpoints of 100 F (37.8 C) or higher, the total of which make up 99 percent or more of the total volume of the mixture. Flammable liquids are known as Class I liquids and are divided into three classes:
* Class IA include liquids that have flash points below 73 F. (22.8 C) and boiling points below 100 F (37.8 C)
* Class IB include liquids that have flash points below 73 F (22.8 C) and boiling points at or above 100 F (37.8 C)
* Class IC includes liquids that have flash points at or above 73 F (22.8 C) and below 100 F (37.8 C)

OSHA, EPA, and DOT have different definitions for similar materials. EPA ignitable liquids include liquids with flash points below 140 F; DOT includes liquids with flash points of less than or equal to 141 F as flammable liquids.

Source: "reg of the day" listserv operated by Tammy Silverthorne @ the Environmental Resource Center



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