Printech Archives, December 1997: Ink Re-blending Software

Ink Re-blending Software

Debra Kramer (
kramer@cmcusa.org)
Mon, 15 Dec 1997 08:38:48 -0600



The following is a response to a question posted from the PNEAC web site, the original questions are at the foot of the page. You might find this information helpful.

Deb Kramer

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Per your question you posted from the PNEAC web site re/ ink re-blending
software & film waste.

In regards to your question about film waste and silver, it sounds like you
are referring to several different wastes from the printers pre-press
department.

My first question is what are they doing with their photo processing chemical
waste? Is that going through a silver recovery unit?
How are they disposing of the these chemicals? Some printers can flush
this down the drain if they are using low silver plates and are within
the local limit for silver discharge. My first advice, if the printer
is N

The film waste and plates may contain trace amounts of silver which is
valuable and both are recyclable. DuPont offers a service that will pick
these materials up (plates, film, spent fixer and developer) for silver
recovery and recycling. You DO NOT have to be using DuPont products
or equipment to utilize this service. But, in order to identify a
service provider that can service this particular printer DuPont needs
to know what town they are located in, what volume they would be generating,
who would

In regards to ink blending software. The only one I am aware of that is
specific to ink reblending and inventory management is Batchmaster and
Mixmaster software programs from Mixmasters, Inc. I believe there are
similar versions that some ink companies have written and distribute,
but I do not have specific information about them.

There is three different versions of Mixmaster software, each with more
features than the previous version. They are Mixmaster, Jr;
Mixmaster Version 1 Series; Mixmaster Version 2 Series,
and Additional Database Disk is available. The software (1996 pricing)
ranges from ~$300 to $1000. The software is capable of providing formulas
to mix desired colors with existing inventory (must be input) all the
way up to tracking daily/weekly/monthly/yearly inventory, flagging the
user when to order specific inks,

Mixmaster can also assist in ink estimating. In regards to ink estimating,
the company needs to begin keeping very careful historical records of
each job run on each press. Job jackets (job history file) should
contain approved artwork from the customer, notes from the prepress
department documenting the type of plates used (exposure time, etc),
notes from the press operator re/ type of substrate run, what kind of
ink used, how much ink actually used, viscosity, problems such as jams,
or web breaks (whe

These job history files or "job jackets" are essential for estimating
ink usage for new jobs. The printer can compare similar jobs and get
an idea of how much ink will actually be needed. This historical
record also acts to identify areas where a problem may have originated.

You can obtain a demo copy of the software from the name and address below.
This software can pay for itself in a relatively short time if it is used
to its potential.

Mixmasters, Inc
11 Colmer Road
Lynn, MA 01904
800/332-9321
Michael Holbrook, Sales Rep.

If you have additional questions or comments please contact me, and
thank you for accessing the PNEAC web site.

Deb Kramer

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This Ask PNEAC question is from:
State of MA
---------------------------------------------
I visited a print shop that is currently disposing of waste film as solid waste.

What would be the most responsible and efficient way for this company to handle the waste? A TCLP could be very expensive to run, even though there may be fairly high levels of silver.
I have heard film recycling suggested as an option. Does anyone have ideas or information on this matter?

Also, this facility has considerable amounts of leftover ink in store.
I have been told that there is a program called "MixMaster" that allows
printers to use portions of leftover ink to mix up new colors, and this would be a way for the shop to use up its leftover ink. How can the shop obtain this program and how much does it cost?

What kinds of programs are available on the market to assist printers in estimating the amount of ink that would be needed to run a print job?


 

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