home.gif search3.gif vendbutton.GIF sheets.gif listervsbutton.gif compicon2.gif

printech, March, 2001
Re: Film setters to reduce hazardous chemicals


New Message Reply About this list Date view Thread view Subject view Author view

From:Gary Jones (gjonesprinting@aol.com )
Date:Thu, 8 Mar 2001 21:03:30


To answer your first question, I am not aware of any funding sources from EPA that would be available for a project of the type you are considering. AT one time EPA did fund some pollution prevention studies, but I think with budget cuts, this funding was dropped. You could check the Office of Research and Development in Cincinnati. Since I am on the road, I don't have a phone number handy. As far as your second question is concerned, is your final output film or plate? If it is film, imagesetters will help cut down the use of chemistry, but will not eliminate it. Imagesetters will image an entire sheet of film and reduce the use of total film use, but still requires conventional chemistry. If you are looking to go to processless film, then the only supplier I know that makes a dry film is Polaroid. I don't know if they still make it, but it was available last year. You will have to investigate to see if it will meet your reproduction needs. There are several direct to plate systems that are thermal based and these seem to the most popular types in the industry. I hope this helps answer your question. Let me know if I can provide any additional information.



New Message Reply About this list Date view Thread view Subject view Author view