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printech, September, 2000
Re: skinning agent


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From:Deb Jacobson(djacobson@istc.illinois.edu)
Date:Wed, 06 Sep 2000 07:46:53 -0500


Sherry - There are inks on the market that do not skin as readily as previous generation offset inks did. If these inks are not acceptable to the printer, they can pour a thin layer of ink compatible oil (commonly linseed, etc) over the top of the ink, or try another brand of aerosol anti-skin spray. Since the oil is compatible with the ink it can simply be mixed in when ready to use again. Another point worth mentioning is proper ink handling methods. The ink should be kept closed unless the press-man is adding or removing ink from the can. This will prevent skinning and contamination in the ink. Prior to closing the can the lip of the can should be coated with petroleum jelly or similar product to form an air tight seal on the can, while the lid is remains easy to remove. This will prevent air from getting into the can. Simultaneously the printer can apply a thin layer of wax paper over the top of the ink so a skin does not form (this replaces the oil or aerosol anti-skin product). Finally, the method of removing ink from the can is another consideration. To prevent excess ink loss due to skinning the press operator should smooth out the surface of the ink in the can. This helps reduce the surface area that can skin. They should avoid digging down into the ink and leaving crevices, etc. that can dry out. I hope this helps, others may have additional recommendations about specific products that have worked for them. Deb Jacobson



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